Saturday, March 5, 2016

What kind of printer do you use for papercrafting?


Here's a question (well, 2 actually) that I would like to ask all papercrafters:
  1. Which brand and model printer do you use?
  2. Are you able to use thicker* paper / cardstock with that printer?
* Have you only tried regular printer paper (thin 75-80 gsm paper) or are you able to use thicker 120-160 gsm, or 200-220 gsm paper as well without your printer complaining?

Myself, I have an HP Photosmart D7160 (like the one in the picture above);

It's an inkjet printer and I always use 200 gsm paper for making papercrafts. That's 2.5 times as thick as regular printer paper, but it feeds through without problems, and makes my papercrafts very sturdy. ;o)

I hope many papercrafters will share their experiences with printers for papercraft, you can do by leaving a comment below please.

Thank you in advance! ;o)

(and you can stay anonymous if you want to of course; you don't need to have a Blogger account or log in to leave a comment on my papercraft weblog! ;o)

30 comments:

  1. my printer is an old HP Deskjet F380 and i use 100g/m² (sometimes 70g/m² for the tiny models)

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    1. Thank you for your reaction! I've heard many other people use different thicknesses of paper for different levels of detail papercrafts, which makes sense of course ;o)

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  2. I have a Brother MFC-9970CDW. It's a business-scale machine that I bought for about $500.

    I know that's out of a lot of folks' price range, but I've had it for several years now and have yet to replace any of the toner cartridges. My printer's page count is around 5000 right now. If you can afford a nice laser printer I highly recommend it. It's worth it just to keep your wallet from bleeding over inkjet cartridge prices.

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    1. Oh! Forgot to add you can use just about any paper short of actual cardboard, though with thicker pieces there might be slight curling that you can fix with a few minutes under a stack of books or something.

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    2. I use an older HP 9800 deskjet A3 printer. Not so fond of the minute detailing any more but for now it'll do. I used to have another printer, a Brother DCP375 next to it but that one went bonkers half a year ago. And ink costs are close to insane.
      As for paper, all of my printers always have been able to work with 200 gpm2 paper, which what I use the most. Easily.

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    3. Whew, that is a little bit out of most people's price range I guess! But then again, like you say, most of the cost of a printer nowadays goes into the ink cartridges / toner...

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    4. Well, in fact I bought it for about 30 euros at a second hand shop where they sold stuff from shops that had gone bankrupt. I too was amazed when seeing the price. Knew I had to have it.

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  4. Epson L355. Does not roll the paper but makes a straight path from feeder to print to tray, so accepts thick paper and card stock very well. Also uses ink wells rather than carriages, so it has long print times and much cheaper ink replacement.

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    1. Thank you for your input! I never used a printer with ink wells, but since papercrafters use a lot of ink, maybe it's something worth looking into for more papercrafters?

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  5. I have an HP Envy 120, it works well. Haven't had any paper curling problems, the ink is some of the cheaper ink that HP sells. I've gone up to 325 gsm (125lb) cardstock without problems.

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    1. Whew, 325 gsm is really thick! I don't think my HP Photosmart would be able to handle cardstock that thick... Thank you for your input!

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  6. hp officejet 7110 doble carta , uso cartulina bristol de 180 gr sin problema

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    1. Thank you for your input! It's nice to see people from all over the world reading my papercraft weblog, I hope my English is good enough for everybody to understand. ;o)

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  7. I use Epson c90 to print on 120 or 160 GSM paper. Thanks!

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  8. I use an HP Officejet Pro 8600. It handles all types of thicker paper very well. I'm pretty sure that the thickest paper I use with it is 250gsm (I know it's 110llb). It's been what I've been using for all my models for the last 3 or so years. I find that the ink cartridges last quite a while as well.

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    1. And everybody can see that your papercrafts turn out very well with those! ;o) Thank you for your input!

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  9. Canon MG6620 and I run 110 index through it with no problem.

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    1. I think that's a "Pixma" too, right? It seems a very popular series from Canon! ;o) Thank you for your feedback!

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  11. I have Brother DCP-135C, I tend to use 170-180 g/m² whenever possible and don't recall any problems while printing on these.

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    1. Thank you for your feedback! 170-180 gsm is very decent for papercraft, so I think it's important any printer can handle those thicknesses. From what people are telling, I think modern printers really don't have any problems with thicker paper, which is great news! ;o)

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  12. For testbuilds and some B&W models, I use my Samsung SCX-3200 (small laser multifunctional). I can feed 180gsm through it without complains.
    Right now I can't afford a laser color, and Inkjet is a bit expensive/unreliable. Because of this, I usually print my models at local print shops, some let you bring your own paper; most don't don't have anything above 150gsm.

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    1. That's the first Samsung printer I've heard so far! ;o) I hope you'll be able to buy yourself a nice colour laser printer soon! It's great that you have the opportunity to go to a local print shop so you can still make colour papercrafts, but it's a big plus to be able to print your own colour prints I think! ;o) Thank you for your feedback!

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  13. I love my Canon Pixma Pro 9000 mark II, I can print tabloid and since I can use this printer in pass-thru mode I can print very thick cardstock. I also have an HP3600 color laser, owever the color quality from the Pixma is the way to go. Since this is ink get, I apply a very light coat of fixatif

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    1. I think next time I get a new printer, I will get a "tabloid" (A3 / wide format) printer too. Not so much for papercraft perhaps, but for me it would be useful to be able to print A3 sheets at home too. ;o) Thank you for your input!

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  14. I use a HP Deskjet F2480 and it works fine for thick paper and thin alike. My thickest was about 250 and it went through without a hitch.

    I wish I would've sprung for a printer with four cartridges instead of only two, though. It sucks when all of the red is used up but the other coulours are fine. Although, I hadn't found papercraft before buying it and it was dirt cheap, some kind of special deal, so...

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    1. Thank you for your feedback! My first printer also only had a black and one colour cartridges, but the one I have now has 6: black, yellow, dark and light magenta and dark and light cyan. The dark colours run out much faster, so it's great that I only need to replace one of them at a time. It's still expensive, though...!

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